The scale is not necessarily your friend. You may want to lose fat – but the scale measures muscles, bone and internal organs as well. Gaining muscle is a good thing. Thus weight or BMI are imperfect ways to measure your progress. This is especially true if you’re just coming off a long period of semi-starvation (calorie counting), as your body may want to restore lost muscles etc. Starting weight training and gaining muscle can also hide your fat loss.
Sometimes even when we try our best, exercises to lose weight can still show little results. Why? Because stressing out about the number on the scale, is still stress and stress = rise in cortisol levels, followed by spikes and dips in blood sugar levels. Try to reframe your journey and think about what you will gain (health, improved mood, and energy) and not what you will lose (body fat). This positive psychology approach and reframing of your mindset are key to actually meeting your weight loss goals sustainably. If losing weight is your ultimate goal, that’s completely ok, just try not to lose sight of the fact that you’re choosing to exercise to make yourself feel better. And if you want support during this lifestyle change, 8fit has your back.
Finally, if you’re looking for a balanced, healthy eating plan that is nutritionist-approved, sign up to our free Healthy Diet Plans. They're a great way to kickstart healthy habits and try out delicious and nutritious recipes. We bring out a brand-new Healthy Diet Plan twice a year, plus plenty of extra recipes, fitness tips and healthy eating inspiration – and if you sign up, you’ll get this all sent straight to your inbox.

It is important to understand that weight is entirely a function of input and output. The input is the food you eat and the calories contained therein. The output is your energy output. To lose weight the output needs to be greater than the input. It is that simple. Do not believe any of the diet fads. If you are currently not gaining or losing weight then just burning 300 extra calories per week or eating/drinking 300 calories less per week (2 sodas for example or a small burger) WILL make you lose weight - in this case around 5 pounds of fat per year.

“If you don’t pay attention to your diet, you can work out every day as hard as you possibly can and not lose a single pound if your calories expended are equal to your calories consumed,” says Donavanik. What’s more, eating junk can make your workouts feel more difficult, so even if you think you’re pushing yourself to the max, you’re not, he says. And sub-max workouts, as you might have guessed, burn fewer calories. He recommends limiting added sugar and focusing on eating lean protein, healthy fats, and whole carbs from fruits, veggies, and whole grains. 
Just like your brain has pain sensors to tell you that the curling iron is hot, your brain has hunger sensors. Basically your brain is telling your stomach “we need nourishment” or in the case of the curling iron “hey, woman that’s hot stop touching it”. The only way to turn off hunger receptors is to feed your body the nourishment it needs to sustain itself… and yep you guessed it that means veggies! (7,8)
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Drinking plenty of water is essential for overall health, and is a great way to boost your weight-loss efforts. But if you’re getting your H2O from cheap bottled water, the bottle itself could pose a problem; Bisphenol A, commonly referred to as BPA, has been linked to obesity, and it’s still found in many cheap plastics. A 2011 Harvard study found that adults with the highest concentration of BPA in their urine had significantly larger waists and a chance of being obese than those without as much of the chemical in their systems. So if you must drink store-bought bottled water, check to see if the bottle is BPA-free. And whatever you do, don’t reuse the same bottle; constantly refilling the same plastic bottle can cause BPA to leak into the water.
This might be the perfect opportunity to try out a new sport or activity. Try a few activities and pick something you enjoy. Chances are, if you enjoy it, you'll keep going. Why not join the 2.5 million people who go swimming once a week? It’s the most popular sport in England. Cycling, football and athletics are also popular. The good news with this is that there’s likely to be lots of teams, leagues and centres in your local area to help you get involved.
A study conducted by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) examined different recommendations for the amount of exercise to lose weight. As a result of the research, the organization recommends that you get between 150 and 250 minutes of moderate to vigorous exercise each week to lose weight. But they also state that more is better. To achieve significant weight loss, the organization recommends over 250 minutes per week.

Exercise has been called a “miracle drug” for its ability to help prevent cancer, diabetes, heart disease, lung disease, and many, many other illnesses. Let’s be honest, there doesn’t seem to be a single health condition that it can’t help in some way. And unlike real drugs, walking has no side effects, is easily accessible, affordable, effective, and best of all you don’t need a prescription! Check out these sneaky ways to walk more steps every day.
Sure, you certainly need to drink plenty of water to help combat bloating, you can (and should!) also consume high-water content foods. Reach for cucumbers, tomatoes, watermelon, asparagus, grapes, celery, artichokes, pineapple, and cranberries — all of which contain diuretic properties that will also help you stay full due to their higher fiber content.
Work indulgence foods into your calorie plan. If you do want to have something that is a little higher in calories, then make sure that you work it into your overall calorie goal for the day. For example, if you are following an 1,800 calorie plan, and you want to have a brownie that is 300 calories, then you would only have 1,500 calories left for the day.

“There are many foods that aid weight loss, but one that I often recommend to my clients and eat myself is grapefruit. Researchers at Scripps Clinic in San Diego found that when obese people ate half a grapefruit before each meal, they dropped an average of 3.5 pounds over 12 weeks. Apparently, the tangy fruit can lower insulin, a fat-storage hormone, and that can lead to weight loss. Plus, since it’s at least 90% water, it can fill you up so you eat less. However, if you are on certain medications you should not have grapefruit or grapefruit juice, so check the label on all your prescriptions, or ask your pharmacist or doctor.” — Patricia Bannan, MS, RDN, author of Eat Right When Time is Tight.
While it's great to be determined to achieve your goals, don't be too hard on yourself if you slip up once in a while. With all the willpower in the world, life can still throw up some serious temptations to knock you off course. Accept that this will happen and that it’s not the end of the world – or the end of your diet. Get straight back on track and don’t let the slip-up make you lose sight of the progress you're making. Hopefully, you'll learn from it and can lessen the chances of it happening again.
Why: The battling ropes may have been labelled as another fitness fad, but there's method to the noisy twine-slamming in the corner of most well-equipped gyms. The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research found that ten 15-second bursts of battle ropes upped participant's heart rate to 180 BPM – the same as cycling or an all-out full-body sprint.
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