Sometimes even when we try our best, exercises to lose weight can still show little results. Why? Because stressing out about the number on the scale, is still stress and stress = rise in cortisol levels, followed by spikes and dips in blood sugar levels. Try to reframe your journey and think about what you will gain (health, improved mood, and energy) and not what you will lose (body fat). This positive psychology approach and reframing of your mindset are key to actually meeting your weight loss goals sustainably. If losing weight is your ultimate goal, that’s completely ok, just try not to lose sight of the fact that you’re choosing to exercise to make yourself feel better. And if you want support during this lifestyle change, 8fit has your back.
“Even though a smart diet is key, exercise can help boost your body’s metabolism to shed fat. Through health care providers often recommend brisk walking or jogging, these exercises may not help you see the results you want. Instead, try interval training. Here’s how: While performing your usual walking or jogging routine, intersperse faster paces periodically throughout your workout. In other words, you may be walking at your normal pace for 2 minutes and then begin a slow jog or fast walk for 1 minute. After the faster speed, return to your slower speed and continue this alternation for 20 minutes. Research shows this type of exercise can stimulate metabolism, melt fat and push your fitness status to the next level.” — Dr. Sean M. Wells, DPT, PT, OCS, ATC/L, CSCS Owner and PT, Naples Personal Training, LLC
While you may want to set up your own individual goals and routes, walking can also be a social occasion, be it through a walking group or through striding out with like-minded souls. It can also help fight off feelings of isolation and loneliness. A survey by the charity Mind found 83 per cent of people with mental health issues look to exercise to help lift their mood.
Why: The battling ropes may have been labelled as another fitness fad, but there's method to the noisy twine-slamming in the corner of most well-equipped gyms. The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research found that ten 15-second bursts of battle ropes upped participant's heart rate to 180 BPM – the same as cycling or an all-out full-body sprint.
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