You can use the cue "warm and slightly out of breath" to gauge your aerobic activity, or you can get more precise and use heart rate. I recommend the heart rate reserve method for calculating a target heart rate. The formula and an example of the method for someone 27 years old, assuming a resting heart rate of 70 beats per minute (bpm), and a training range of 70%, may be found below. Aerobic exercise falls in the range from 40% to 85%. You can plug in your own values to find your aerobic range.
But it’s not only your creativity that will benefit from the mental lift. The act of walking is also a proven mood booster. One study found that just 12 minutes of walking resulted in an increase in joviality, vigor, attentiveness and self-confidence versus the same time spent sitting. Walking in nature, specifically, was found to reduce ruminating over negative experiences, which increases activity in the brain associated with negative emotions and raises risk of depression.
Greater stroke volume means the heart doesn't have to pump as fast to meet the demands of exercise. Fewer beats and more stroke volume mean greater efficiency. Think about a pump emptying water out of a flooded basement. The pump works better and lasts longer if it can pump larger volumes of water with each cycle than if it has to pump faster and strain to get rid of the water. High stroke volume is why athletes' hearts don't pump as fast during exercise and why they have such low resting heart rates; sometimes as low as 40 beats per minute, whereas the average is 60-80 beats per minutes.
I’m thinking your calculator is a bit high, either that or I’m not using it right, so I’d like some advice on how to use it. I entered my gender, age, height and weight, and then I entered 24 hours worth of a particular day’s activities, including sleeping. It calculated 3259.2940 calories. Only 255 calories were for my mild 1-hour gym workout. I’m male, 66, 6’2″, 177lbs. On a 50 carbs, 30 fat, 20 protein, I’d still need over 150 grams of protein/day which my doctor says is too much for a man my age’s kidneys. You didn’t have a “sit relaxed and reclined with a laptop doing different things on the computer” entry where I spend about 8 hours/day so I used “studying” which calculated to 1298 calories. I’m really only mildly active during the day, just a couple of short walks a day and the usual errands and life-maintaining activities. I would think I’m an average 2,000 calorie/day guy. I don’t understand why it’s calculating so high (high in my opinion). Any thoughts? Thanks.
You may want to consider keeping a simple log of your walking sessions. If you have a pedometer, a tool that calculates your steps and distance, you can write down how many steps you’ve taken that day. Did you walk on a treadmill? Write down your time, distance, and pace in a notebook or an Excel spreadsheet. Looking back on all your steps is a great way to stay motivated.
Can you up those numbers? The more you weigh, the more calories you’ll burn, no matter the activity—that’s because it takes more energy to move more weight. If you’re specifically looking to up calorie burn, adding a 20-pound weighted vest would up your calorie burn to 8.7 and 15.1 per minute for walking and running, respectively. It’s simple physics: “The majority of calories burned in running [or walking] comes from supporting body weight while moving up and down,” says Hunter. “With more weight, there will be a greater energy cost in doing this due to a greater gravitational force.”
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