Many people aim for a daily goal of 10,000 steps (or about 5 miles)—and an industry of fitness tracking devices has emerged to support them—but that magic number didn’t originate from scientific research, says John Schuna Jr., Ph.D., assistant professor of kinesiology at Oregon State College of Public Health. “It was first used in a Japanese marketing effort associated with one of the first commercial pedometers.” The device was called “manpo-kei,” which literally means "10,000 steps meter" in Japanese. 

Aerobic exercise comprises innumerable forms. In general, it is performed at a moderate level of intensity over a relatively long period of time. For example, running a long distance at a moderate pace is an aerobic exercise, but sprinting is not. Playing singles tennis, with near-continuous motion, is generally considered aerobic activity, while golf or two person team tennis, with brief bursts of activity punctuated by more frequent breaks, may not be predominantly aerobic. Some sports are thus inherently "aerobic", while other aerobic exercises, such as fartlek training or aerobic dance classes, are designed specifically to improve aerobic capacity and fitness. It is most common for aerobic exercises to involve the leg muscles, primarily or exclusively. There are some exceptions. For example, rowing to distances of 2,000 meters or more is an aerobic sport that exercises several major muscle groups, including those of the legs, abdominals, chest, and arms.
All of this is moot until you’ve started using an active foot; before that, hip flexors just dominate, accruing all the power and then not knowing what to do with it. It all sounds pretty straightforward but also, impossible: how can it be that simple, that one minute you start thinking of your back foot as Velcro, and the next, you have activated the right muscles, in the right way, in the right sequence?
Aerobic exercise is believed by many scientists to be the single best predictor of weight maintenance. You can lose weight without exercise by reducing your caloric intake enough so that you burn more calories than you consume, but it takes a regular dose of exercise to keep your weight off. How much is not clear, but somewhere between 30 and 40 minutes of vigorous exercise several times per week, to 45 to 75 minutes of moderate intensity exercise five or more days per week is probably about right. Your mileage will vary, and so once you get to the weight that you want to be at you'll need to experiment with different amounts of exercise until you find the one that works for you. The American College of Sports Medicine recommends that overweight and obese individuals progressively increase to a minimum of 150 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity per week, but for long-term weight loss, overweight and obese adults should eventually progress to 200 to 300 minutes per week of moderate-intensity physical activity. These are general guidelines, and so again, you need to experiment to see what works for you.
Bone density develops most quickly during childhood and adolescence, with peak bone mass reached sometime in the mid-20s or early 30s, depending on the person. At this point, osteoblasts slow the production of new bone cells, and bone-destroying osteoclasts continue at the same pace. What ends up occurring is that bone is broken down more quickly than it’s built up, resulting in its slow thinning. This thinning increases rapidly in women post-menopause, and seems to increase in men later in life.
Walking is an accessible and easy way for us all to get more active. Brisk walking that raises your heart rate and makes you warm and slightly breathless is a great form of aerobic exercise. Doing this regularly helps you to get fitter so you will find it easier to be more active and get tired less quickly. You may feel more tired in the first week or two after you start. But if you keep it up, you’ll probably find you soon have more energy than when you were inactive.
This one may seem obvious, but it's certainly a happy benefit for those who start walking regularly, says Dr. Jampolis. "As you continue to walk, you may notice your pants begin to fit more loosely around your midsection, even if the number on the scale isn't moving much," she says. "That's because regular walking can help improve your body's response to insulin, which can help reduce belly fat." Ariel Iasevoli, a personal trainer at Crunch gyms in New York City, adds that walking every day is one of the most effective low-impact ways to mobilize fat and positively alter body composition. "Daily walking increases metabolism by burning extra calories and by preventing muscle loss, which is particularly important as we get older," says Iasevoli. The best part? You don't have to slog it out on a treadmill at the gym to see these benefits. "One of my clients reduced her body fat by 2% in just one month by walking home from work each day, which was just under a mile," she says.

I’m thinking your calculator is a bit high, either that or I’m not using it right, so I’d like some advice on how to use it. I entered my gender, age, height and weight, and then I entered 24 hours worth of a particular day’s activities, including sleeping. It calculated 3259.2940 calories. Only 255 calories were for my mild 1-hour gym workout. I’m male, 66, 6’2″, 177lbs. On a 50 carbs, 30 fat, 20 protein, I’d still need over 150 grams of protein/day which my doctor says is too much for a man my age’s kidneys. You didn’t have a “sit relaxed and reclined with a laptop doing different things on the computer” entry where I spend about 8 hours/day so I used “studying” which calculated to 1298 calories. I’m really only mildly active during the day, just a couple of short walks a day and the usual errands and life-maintaining activities. I would think I’m an average 2,000 calorie/day guy. I don’t understand why it’s calculating so high (high in my opinion). Any thoughts? Thanks.
Just get up and walk! You don’t really even need to change your clothes or shoes (unless you’re wearing heels, of course). Note: If you’re looking to go for a power walk, then changing clothes and putting on proper shoes is probably a good idea. Go for a walk periodically throughout your day or head out for a walking meeting at work instead of sitting in a meeting room. And, for those of you who don’t have time to make it to the gym in the morning, you can just head out the door first thing in the morning and walk it out.

Now see the effects of taking your walking speed up to brisk walking paces of 4 mph or more. You will burn more calories per mile as you increase your speed, but the biggest factor will still be how much you weigh. One benefit of walking faster is that you can walk farther in the same amount of time. If you walk for a set amount of time, that will mean burning more calories during an exercise session.


When bones thin too much – a disease called osteoporosis – you become more susceptible to fractures. In young people, whose bones remodel and rebuild with ease, this might not be too concerning. However, if you are an older individual or have compromised bone density, fractures can significantly affect quality of life and impact your ability to perform the daily activities you need to remain independent.
To estimate the amount of energy—remember, energy equals calories—the body uses during physical activity (versus when you’re at rest), scientists use a unit that measures the metabolic equivalent for task (MET). One MET is what your body burns while lounging on the couch watching Netflix. Walking, a "moderate" exercise, uses 3 to 6 METs; running, which is typically classified as "vigorous," uses 6 METs or more.
If you’re like most people, you walk just under three miles every day in the course of your normal activities. Now it’s time to get a little more purposeful. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the American College of Sports Medicine, and the Surgeon General all agree that at least 30 minutes of brisk physical exercise is good for your health, and walking is one of the easiest forms of exercise to get.
These exercise sessions are done in a swimming pool and are available at some fitness centres or through local community health services. Aquarobics is a low-impact way to improve heart fitness and muscle strength without stressing the joints. It’s particularly suitable for anyone who’s pregnant, has joint problems and is overweight or unused to exercise.

While you may want to set up your own individual goals and routes, walking can also be a social occasion, be it through a walking group or through striding out with like-minded souls. It can also help fight off feelings of isolation and loneliness. A survey by the charity Mind found 83 per cent of people with mental health issues look to exercise to help lift their mood.
These electrons have powerful antioxidant effects that can protect your body from inflammation and its many well-documented health consequences. For example, one scientific review published in the "Journal of Environmental and Public Health" concluded that grounding (walking barefoot on the earth) could improve a number of health conditions, including the following:15
There's some good news for people undergoing cancer treatment. In one study, aerobic exercise performed five days per week for 30-35 minutes for six weeks at 80% of maximal heart rate reduced fatigue in women being treated for cancer. In another study, 10 weeks of aerobic exercise at 60% of maximum heart rate for 30-40 minutes, four days per week, reduced depression and anxiety in female cancer patients. Aerobic exercise isn't a panacea when it comes to cancer, but evidence suggests that it certainly can help.
Bupa Australia Pty Ltd makes no warranties or representations regarding the completeness or accuracy of the information. Bupa Australia is not liable for any loss or damage you suffer arising out of the use of or reliance on the information. Except that which cannot be excluded by law. We recommend that you consult your doctor or other qualified health professional if you have questions or concerns about your health. For more details on how we produce our health content, visit the About our health information page.
7. US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, The President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports. Physical activity and health: a report of the Surgeon General. Washington (DC): US Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Surgeon General, 1996. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/sgr/summary.htm
Another American study found that people who walked for at least four hours a week gained less weight (an average nine pounds less) than couch potatoes as they got older. Last year, researchers at the University of Colorado found that regular walking helped to prevent peripheral artery disease (which impairs blood flow in the legs and causes leg pain in one-fifth of elderly people).
Walking is a low-cost and effective form of exercise. However, the wrong type of shoe or walking action can cause foot or shin pain, blisters and injuries to soft tissue. Make sure your shoes are comfortable, with appropriate heel and arch supports. Take light, easy steps and make sure your heel touches down before your toes. Whenever possible, walk on grass rather than concrete to help absorb the impact.

Your local gym will provide a wide variety of aerobic options, such as treadmills, cross trainers, exercise bikes, stairmasters, rowing and ski machines so that you can just switch on and get started with your workout. It can be a good idea to diversify between different machines and different speeds/levels of resistance as your body can get used to a certain routine and after a number of sessions the same routine will not work your heart and lungs as much as it once did.


And then, of course, there’s speed: “Speed has a huge effect on caloric expenditure,” Hunter says. “The faster someone runs, the more calories they will burn per minute. However, by distance, there is a relatively steady amount of calories burned.” For example, in 30 minutes of running at 6 miles per hour (that’s a 10-minute mile pace), a 155-pound person will burn 372 calories. At 6.7 mph (or a 9-minute mile), they’ll burn 409 calories, and at 7.5 mph (an 8-minute mile pace), they’ll burn 465 calories. To double your calorie burn per mile, you’d have to literally cut more than 4 minutes off your pace, which is a huge amount of time. (Fast walking can actually help you raise your calorie burn to the same amount as what you’d burn jogging, in fact.)
A higher percentage of fat is burned during aerobic exercise than during anaerobic exercise. Here's why. Fat is denser than carbohydrate (fat has nine calories per gram and carbohydrate has four), and so it takes more oxygen to burn it. During aerobic exercise, more oxygen is delivered to the muscles than during anaerobic exercise, and so it follows that a higher percentage of fat is burned during aerobic exercise when more oxygen is available. When less oxygen is present, like during anaerobic exercise, a higher percentage of carbohydrate is burned.
Interval training is more intense than simple aerobic training. It's a very effective way to increase your fitness level (remember stroke volume and mitochondria activity!), but it's tough, and so I recommend holding off until you build up to 20-30 minutes of aerobic exercise. The idea to intervals is to set up work to active-rest ratios (work:active-rest), and as you get more fit, decrease the active-rest interval and increase the work interval. The work interval of the ratio is a speed that is faster than what you usually do, and the active-rest interval is your usual speed. To do it, you start at your usual speed for five to eight minutes, then increase the speed to the work interval for one to three minutes, then slow down to your usual speed for a few minutes to catch your breath (this is the active-rest interval), and then you repeat the cycling for the duration of your workout.
8. Gregg EW, Cauley JA, Stone K, Thompson TJ, Bauer DC, Cummings SR, Ensrud KE. Relationship of changes in physical activity and mortality among older women. J Am Med Assoc 2003: 289 (18): 2379-86. myDr myDr provides comprehensive Australian health and medical information, images and tools covering symptoms, diseases, tests, medicines and treatments, and nutrition and fitness.
The hamstring, by the way, has two functions, hip extension and knee flexion. One it really enjoys – knee flexion – and the other, not so much. If you stand on one leg and swing the other backwards and forwards, you can see this immediately: your forward swing will be higher than your backward, and on the backswing you’ll want to bend your knee. But when the hamstring is properly “recruited” – this is what it’s called, when a movement activates a muscle – it has huge propulsive power, as well as opening up the world in which your glutes (butt muscles) can also do some of the work.
How much good does it do you to get up and walk for a few minutes? Don't be discouraged from walking if you think the number of calories burned is too small. The benefits go beyond burning calories. Simply reducing your sitting time will help keep your muscles, joints, blood circulation, and bones in good working order. By walking more and sitting less throughout the day, you'll burn more calories, reduce your health risks, and do your body good.
When it comes to losing or managing weight, calories come into play. And it’s not just the calories you consume through food that matter – it’s the calories you burn through activity, those you burn while digesting and assimilating food (thermic effect of food), and the ones you burn each day (basal metabolic rate) just to maintain basic bodily function.
Aquatic exercise programs are an alternative for people with rheumatologic conditions because the buoyancy of water helps reduce loading on joints and thus makes it easier for patients with arthritis or fibromyalgia to exercise. These programs can include a combination of limb movements against water resistance and walking or jogging in the pool. Several studies of aquatic programs have reported improvements in pain, muscle strength, aerobic capacity, self-report and performance-based measures of function, daytime fatigue, anxiety, and depression.34,35,37

		(function(f,a){function g(b,a,c){b.addEventListener?b.addEventListener(a,c):b.attachEvent("on"+a,function(){c.call(b)})}function k(b){b&&("string"==typeof b["class"]&&b["class"]&&a.getElementById("uglipop_popbox").setAttribute("class",b["class"]),b.keepLayout&&!b["class"]&&a.getElementById("uglipop_popbox").setAttribute("style","position:relative;height:300px;width:300px;background-color:white;opacity:1;"),"string"==typeof b.content&&b.content&&"html"==b.source&&(a.getElementById("uglipop_popbox").innerHTML=b.content),"string"==typeof b.content&&b.content&&"div"==b.source&&(a.getElementById("uglipop_popbox").innerHTML=a.getElementById(b.content).innerHTML));a.getElementById("uglipop_overlay_wrapper").style.display="";a.getElementById("uglipop_overlay").style.display="";a.getElementById("uglipop_content_fixed").style.display=""}function h(){a.getElementById("uglipop_overlay_wrapper").style.display="none";a.getElementById("uglipop_overlay").style.display="none";a.getElementById("uglipop_content_fixed").style.display="none"}g(a,"DOMContentLoaded",function(){var b=a.createElement("div"),e=a.createElement("div"),c=a.createElement("div"),d=a.createElement("div");e.id="uglipop_content_fixed";e.setAttribute("style","position:fixed;top: 50%;left: 50%;transform: translate(-50%, -50%);-webkit-transform: translate(-50%, -50%);-ms-transform: translate(-50%, -50%);opacity:1;z-index:10000000;");c.id="uglipop_popbox";d.id="uglipop_overlay_wrapper";d.setAttribute("style","position:absolute;top:0;bottom:0;left:0;right:0;display:none");b.id="uglipop_overlay";b.setAttribute("style","position:fixed;top:0;bottom:0;left:0;right:0;opacity:0.3;width:100%;height:100%;background-color:black;");d.appendChild(b);e.appendChild(c);a.body.appendChild(d);a.body.appendChild(e);a.getElementById("uglipop_overlay_wrapper").style.display="none";a.getElementById("uglipop_overlay").style.display="none";a.getElementById("uglipop_content_fixed").style.display="none";d.addEventListener("click",h);g(f,"keydown",function(a){27==a.keyCode&&h()});f.uglipop=k})})(window,document);

If it’s too difficult to walk for 30 minutes at one time, do regular small bouts (10 minutes) three times per day and gradually build up to longer sessions. However, if your goal is to lose weight, you will need to do physical activity for longer than 30 minutes each day. You can still achieve this by starting with smaller bouts of activity throughout the day and increasing these as your fitness improves.
After World War II, non-organized, individualistic, health-oriented physical and recreational activities, such as jogging, began to become popular.[9] The Royal Canadian Air Force Exercise Plans, developed by Dr. Bill Orban and published in 1961, helped to launch modern fitness culture.[10][11] There was a running boom in the 1970s, inspired by the Olympics.[12]
Just get up and walk! You don’t really even need to change your clothes or shoes (unless you’re wearing heels, of course). Note: If you’re looking to go for a power walk, then changing clothes and putting on proper shoes is probably a good idea. Go for a walk periodically throughout your day or head out for a walking meeting at work instead of sitting in a meeting room. And, for those of you who don’t have time to make it to the gym in the morning, you can just head out the door first thing in the morning and walk it out.
Exercise has been called a “miracle drug” for its ability to help prevent cancer, diabetes, heart disease, lung disease, and many, many other illnesses. Let’s be honest, there doesn’t seem to be a single health condition that it can’t help in some way. And unlike real drugs, walking has no side effects, is easily accessible, affordable, effective, and best of all you don’t need a prescription! Check out these sneaky ways to walk more steps every day.
Vary your walking workout to keep it interesting and you will also burn more calories. Incorporate a couple of inclines into your walking route. If you exercise on a treadmill, set it at a slope for part of the time. Walking more extreme inclines makes your workout more like hiking, which burns twice the amount of calories than walking on a flat route.
Walking might not have the same visual appeal as high-intensity interval training or step aerobics, but this simple exercise can be an efficient way to burn calories. Whether you're anxious to shed a few pounds or are just keen to avoid the middle-age spread, walking several times per week (in combination with a healthy diet, of course) can burn thousands of calories to help keep the excess pounds at bay. Consult your doctor before beginning any exercise regimen, even a light one.
Just get up and walk! You don’t really even need to change your clothes or shoes (unless you’re wearing heels, of course). Note: If you’re looking to go for a power walk, then changing clothes and putting on proper shoes is probably a good idea. Go for a walk periodically throughout your day or head out for a walking meeting at work instead of sitting in a meeting room. And, for those of you who don’t have time to make it to the gym in the morning, you can just head out the door first thing in the morning and walk it out.
OK, so maybe you won’t have the ability to see through walls but you can protect your vision as you age by taking a daily walk, according to a study published in the Journal of Neuroscience. Researchers found that people who did regular aerobic activity had healthier eyeballs and were less likely to suffer from problems like retinal degeneration and age-related vision loss. So even if you aren’t Superman, you’ll still have super sight. Find out what your walking style says about your personality.

No matter how fast you walk, though, make sure you’re moving at a pace that will challenge your heart and improve your health. You should be able to hold a conversation, but not be moving so leisurely that you could sing a song. If you feel your body begin to get warm and sense that your heart rate is slightly elevated those are other signs you’re moving at an appropriate pace. (Looking for a challenge? This simple, surprising move will make your walking routine way more effective.)
So to recap, walking daily is excellent. Walking daily for 10,000 steps or more is even better. And if you can do so outdoors in the sunshine, and barefoot for grounding, you’ll enjoy even greater benefits. To be clear, you don’t have to do your 10,000 steps a day all at once. You can break up your daily steps into any size increments that work for you. You might walk for one hour in the early morning, 30 minutes during your lunch hour, and another hour in the evening. Or you might enjoy taking shorter 20-minute walks throughout your day.
Medicine FinderLatest NewsVideo: Poor diet responsible for 1 in 5 deathsVideo: Flu awarenessVideo: Measles - global outbreakVideo: Private Health Insurance reformsVideo: Parkinson's disease awarenessKeeping a stable weight can cut diabetes riskThis web site is intended for Australian residents and is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Information and interactions contained in this Web site are for information purposes only and are not intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Further, the accuracy, currency and completeness of the information available on this Web site cannot be guaranteed. Tonic Digital Media Pty Ltd, its affiliates and their respective servants and agents do not accept any liability for any injury, loss or damage incurred by use of or reliance on the information made available via or through myDr whether arising from negligence or otherwise. See Privacy Policy and Disclaimer.2001-2019 myDr.com.au © | All Rights Reserved About UsContact UsDisclaimerPrivacy PolicyAdvertising PolicySitemap
If you currently praise coffee for keeping your digestive system going strong, get ready to start thanking your morning walk instead. That's because a regular walking routine can greatly improve gastric mobility, says Tara Alaichamy, DPT, a physical therapist at Cancer Treatment Centers of America. "One of the very first things an abdominal surgery patient is required to do is to walk because it utilizes core and abdominal muscles, encouraging movement in our GI system," she says. (Check out these 7 things your poop says about your health.)
Whether you're feeling stuck at work or you've been searching for a solution to a tricky problem, research shows it's a good idea to get moving: According to a 2014 study in the Journal of Experimental Psychology, Learning, Memory, and Cognition, going for a walk can spark creativity. "Researchers administered creative-thinking tests to subjects while seated and while walking and found that the walkers thought more creatively than the sitters," says Dr. Jampolis.

Keep fit, tone-up and lose weight - walking is the perfect way to achieve optimum health, hassle free. Power-walking expert Nina Barough reveals there is a world of difference between a casual stroll and an energising, body-sculpting power walk. Founder of the annual Moonwalk, Nina explains how this low-impact form of exercise can be done by anyone, anywhere at anytime and her total walking programme will help you achieve health, vitality and weight-loss.
However, I also do some form of "exercise" every day. This includes strength training twice a week, HIIT twice a week with weights or on an elliptical machine, and a light 10-minute workout three times a week on recovery days. But since walking isn't exactly exercise, you can do it everyday without needing any recovery days for your body to repair and regenerate; it doesn't tear down your body much, so it doesn't require recovery time.
Medicine FinderLatest NewsVideo: Poor diet responsible for 1 in 5 deathsVideo: Flu awarenessVideo: Measles - global outbreakVideo: Private Health Insurance reformsVideo: Parkinson's disease awarenessKeeping a stable weight can cut diabetes riskThis web site is intended for Australian residents and is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Information and interactions contained in this Web site are for information purposes only and are not intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Further, the accuracy, currency and completeness of the information available on this Web site cannot be guaranteed. Tonic Digital Media Pty Ltd, its affiliates and their respective servants and agents do not accept any liability for any injury, loss or damage incurred by use of or reliance on the information made available via or through myDr whether arising from negligence or otherwise. See Privacy Policy and Disclaimer.2001-2019 myDr.com.au © | All Rights Reserved About UsContact UsDisclaimerPrivacy PolicyAdvertising PolicySitemap
Walking is a great way to improve or maintain your overall health. Just 30 minutes every day can increase cardiovascular fitness, strengthen bones, reduce excess body fat, and boost muscle power and endurance. It can also reduce your risk of developing conditions such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis and some cancers. Unlike some other forms of exercise, walking is free and doesn’t require any special equipment or training.

Whether you are about to start a walking program or you've been walking regularly, it pays to work on your walking posture and stride to get the most benefits. Beginners should first prepare with a check-up and the right clothes and shoes. Everyone can then benefit from using the best walking technique for posture, arm motion, and stride. Use a schedule to build up your walking time and practice your technique.

There is a very big discrepancy between the Kcal burned for 30 minute elliptical on your calculator, vs the cound on the machine itself. 100% difference. When my elliptical says 300 Kcal, this calculator says 679. I don’t know which is right, but the guy at the YMCA says trust the machine (though I haven’t entered ht, wt, etc). What is your take on this?
Adding interval training workouts to your routine can boost your calorie burn for an entire day. Check out the HealthStatus program based on HIIT and add this to your routine. In addition, drinking caffeine, consuming capsaicin-rich hot sauce, fidgeting, and climbing the stairs are ways to burn calories without much time or effort. With these strategies, weight loss doesn’t have to be complicated!
You may want to consider keeping a simple log of your walking sessions. If you have a pedometer, a tool that calculates your steps and distance, you can write down how many steps you’ve taken that day. Did you walk on a treadmill? Write down your time, distance, and pace in a notebook or an Excel spreadsheet. Looking back on all your steps is a great way to stay motivated.
Most activities can be performed aerobically or anaerobically. For example, you could walk briskly on the treadmill at 3.5 miles per hour and feel warm and slightly out of breath (aerobic), or you could walk very briskly at 4.5 miles per hour and feel very out of breath (anaerobic). The same is true for biking, swimming, dancing, or virtually any other activity. The intensity of the workout determines whether an activity is aerobic or anaerobic, and all you need to do is pace yourself to elicit the type of training you desire.
In July 1996, research from the Cooper Institute showed that participating in moderate to high levels of physical activity reduced the risk of dying from any given cause. This held true regardless of other risk factors. In other words, even if an individual suffers from high blood pressure or obesity, the chances of dying are lessened by maintaining at least a moderate level of fitness. This is remarkably good news, especially for individuals who have hereditary risk factors such as a family history of heart disease.
Believe it or not, walking can actually increase your intelligence. Walking helps to supply the brain with the required amounts of oxygen and glucose, which helps it function better. It also decreases the levels of LDL cholesterol, which clogs arteries, and hence reduces the risk of stroke (7). So, walking can help improve blood circulation, which helps the brain and cellular functions.
Most activities can be performed aerobically or anaerobically. For example, you could walk briskly on the treadmill at 3.5 miles per hour and feel warm and slightly out of breath (aerobic), or you could walk very briskly at 4.5 miles per hour and feel very out of breath (anaerobic). The same is true for biking, swimming, dancing, or virtually any other activity. The intensity of the workout determines whether an activity is aerobic or anaerobic, and all you need to do is pace yourself to elicit the type of training you desire.
Content on this website is provided for information purposes only. Information about a therapy, service, product or treatment does not in any way endorse or support such therapy, service, product or treatment and is not intended to replace advice from your doctor or other registered health professional. The information and materials contained on this website are not intended to constitute a comprehensive guide concerning all aspects of the therapy, product or treatment described on the website. All users are urged to always seek advice from a registered health care professional for diagnosis and answers to their medical questions and to ascertain whether the particular therapy, service, product or treatment described on the website is suitable in their circumstances. The State of Victoria and the Department of Health & Human Services shall not bear any liability for reliance by any user on the materials contained on this website.
×